Lisa Alvarez

Lisa Alvarez’s prose and poetry have most recently appeared in Faultline, Huizache, Los Angeles Times, Santa Monica Review, Truthdig, Zocalo Public Square and in anthologies, including Sudden Fiction Latino: Short-Short Stories from the United States and Latin America. Together with Andrew Tonkovich, she edited Orange County: A Literary Field Guide, published by Heyday in February 2017. With Alan Cheuse, she edited Writers Workshop in a Book: The Community of Writers on the Art of Fiction. She is a professor of English at Irvine Valley College and co-directs the Writers Workshops at the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.

Photo credit: Brett Hall Jones

Ramona Ausubel

Ramona Ausubel is the author of two novels and two story collections. Her most recent book, Awayland, was a New York Times Editors’ Choice selection. She is also the author of Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty, No One is Here Except All of Us and A Guide to Being Born. She is the recipient of the PEN/USA Fiction Award and the Cabell First Novelist Award and was a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Award. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Tin House, One Story, Ploughshares and many other journals. www.ramonaausubel.com

Photo Credit: Teo Grossman

Leland Cheuk

Leland Cheuk, A MacDowell Colony fellow, is the author of the novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong (CCLaP, 2015) and a collection of stories, Letters From Dinosaurs (Thought Catalog, 2016)s. His next book, No Good Very Bad Asian, a novel, is forthcoming in Fall 2019 from C&R Press. His work has been covered in The Paris Review, VICE, Electric Literature, The Millions, and The Rumpus, and has appeared in Salon, Catapult, Joyland Magazine, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. He is the fiction editor at Newfound Journal and the founder of the indie press 7.13 Books. He lives in Brooklyn. www.lelandcheuk.com

Tyler Dilts

Tyler Dilts received his MA in English Literature and MFA in Fiction Writing from California State University, Long Beach. His work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Best American Mystery Stories, and he is the author of the Long Beach Homicide series of detective novels: A King of Infinite Space, The Pain Scale, A Cold and Broken Hallelujah (An Amazon #1 Bestseller), the Edgar Award-nominated Come Twilight, and most recently the standalone novel, Mercy Dogs. He lives with his wife in Long Beach, California and teaches creative writing at CSULB.

Photo Credit: Teo Grossman

Frances Dinkelspiel

Frances Dinkelspiel is a journalist and the author of two nonfiction books, Towers of Gold: How One Jewish Immigrant Named Isaias Hellman Created California, which was a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller and was named one of the paper’s best books of the year, and Tangled Vines: Greed, Murder, Obsession and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California, which was both a New York Times bestseller and a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller. Frances is the co-founder and executive editor of Berkeleyside, an award-winning news site. A former staff writer for the Syracuse Newspapers and the Mercury News, her freelance work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, People magazine and The Daily Beast. Frances and her work have been featured in American Greed, Who Do You Think You Are?, with the actress Helen Hunt, and American Jerusalem: Jews and the Making of San Francisco. Frances lives in Berkeley. www.francesdinkelspiel.com

Photo Credit: Nathan Phillips

 

Alex Espinoza

Alex Espinoza earned his MFA in Fiction from UC Irvine. He’s the author of the novels Still Water Saints and The Five Acts of Diego León, both from Random House. His newest book is Cruising: An Intimate History of a Radical Pastime (Unnamed Press, June 2019). He has written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, and NPR’s All Things Considered. The recipient of a fellowship in prose from the NEA and an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation, he lives and teaches in Los Angeles and is completing a new novel. www.alexespinoza.com

Photo Credit: Tracy Hall

 

Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch is the author of White Oleander, Paint It Black, The Revolution of Marina M. and, new in July, Chimes of a Lost Cathedral. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Black Clock, Los Angeles Noir, Room of One’s Own, Black Warrior Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Los Angeles Times, and Real Simple. She has taught at the USC Master of Professional Writing Program, the UCLA Writer’s Program, the Esalen Institute and Pomona College. Her essay on writing from the senses appears in Writer’s Workshop in A Book: The Squaw Valley Community of Writers on the Art of Fiction.   www.janetfitchwrites.com 

Photo credit: Cat Gwynn

Dagoberto Gilb

Dagoberto Gilb is the author of Before the End, After the Beginning; The Flowers; Gritos; Woodcuts of Women; The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acuña; and The Magic of Blood, which won the PEN/Hemingway Award. His fiction and nonfiction has appeared in many magazines, including Harper’s, The New Yorker, and Texas Monthly, and are reprinted widely. A union high-rise carpenter for nearly two decades, Gilb is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Whiting Writers Award, and has been a finalist for both the PEN/Faulkner and National Book Critics Circle Awards. He is the founding editor of Huizache magazine. He makes his home in Austin.

Photo Credit: Jean Luc Bertini

 

Sands Hall

Sands Hall is the author of the novel Catching Heaven (Ballantine), a Penguin/Random House Reader’s Circle Selection and a Willa Award Finalist for Best Contemporary Fiction. Her plays include an adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, which recently enjoyed its tenth production, and the comic/drama Fair Use. A singer/songwriter,  she recently produced her first CD, called Rustler’s Moon and performs widely. Involved with theatre for many years, her directing experience runs the gamut from Shakespeare to Giradoux to new works by new playwrights, and she has an extensive acting resume. She is the author of a book of writing essays and exercises, Tools of the Writer’s Craft.  She is currently an adjunct assistant professor of English and Creative Writing at Franklin & Marshall College, in Lancaster, PA, where she is also the editor of the F&M Alumni Arts Review. Her memoir, Flunk.Start., was published by Counterpoint Press in 2018. www.sandshall.com

 

Rachel Howard

Rachel Howard is the author of a novel, The Risk of Us, and a memoir, The Lost Night. Her fiction, essays, and dance criticism have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Waxwing, Zyzzyva, and elsewhere. The former interim director of Undergraduate Creative Writing at Warren Wilson College, she teaches frequently for Stanford Continuing Studies and at the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto. She lives in Nevada City, California. www.rachelhoward.com

Photo Credit: Emmet Cullen

 

Vanessa Hua

Vanessa Hua is a columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and the author of the short story collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, and the debut novel, A River of Stars. For two decades, she has been writing about Asia and the diaspora. She has received a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers Award, the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and a Steinbeck Fellowship in Creative Writing, as well as honors from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and elsewhere.  www.vanessahua.com

Photo Credit: Andria Lo

Rhoda Huffey

Rhoda Huffey is the author of The Hallelujah Side, and has published stories in Ploughshares, Santa Monica Review, Tinhouse, Rattling Wall, and Green Mountains Review. She lives in Venice, California, where she is a tap dancer.

Photo Credit: Brett Hall

Louis B. Jones

Louis B. Jones is the author of the novels Ordinary Money (Viking); Particles and Luck and California’s Over (Pantheon); Radiance, and Innocence (Counterpoint). His short fiction and essays have appeared in ZYZZYVA, The Threepenny Review, Open City, The Sun, Santa Monica Review, the Pushcart Prize, and The Best of Pushcart reprint anthology. He co-directs the Writers Workshops at the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.  www.louisbjones.com

Photo Credit: Brett Hall Jones

 

Krys Lee

Krys Lee is the author of Drifting House and How I Became a North Korean, and the translator of I Hear Your Voice and Diary of a Murderer: And Other Stories by Young-ha Kim. She is the recipient of the Rome Prize and the Story Prize Spotlight Award, and a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize and the BBC International Story Prize. Her fiction, journalism, and literary translations have appeared in Granta, the New York Times Book Review, Corriere della Sera, and The Guardian, among others. She is an assistant professor of creative writing and literature at Yonsei University, Underwood International College, in South Korea. www.kryslee.com

Photo Credit: Matt Douma

 

 

Tom Lutz

Tom Lutz is the founding editor of Los Angeles Review of Books and founder of the LARB/USC Publishing Workshop, LARB Radio Hour, and LARB Books. He is the American Book Award-winning author of And the Monkey Learned Nothing, Drinking Mare’s Milk, Crying, Doing Nothing, and other books, and has published over a hundred pieces in journals, magazines, newspapers, and collections, and has written for TV and film. He has taught at Iowa, Stanford, CalArts, and Copenhagen, and is now Distinguished Professor at UC Riverside’s Department of Creative Writing. https://lareviewofbooks.org/contributor/tom-lutz/

Photo Credit: David Walter Banks

Patricia K. Meyer

Patricia K. Meyer is a writer/producer in film and television who has written numerous screenplay adaptations for Martin Scorsese, as well as all the major studios. She has produced eight television movies, including the Emmy-nominated miniseries, The Women of Brewster Place. After serving for ten years as Senior Lecturer in Screenwriting at the American Film Institute Conservatory, she is the Director of Graduate Screening and a Clinical Assistant Professor of Screenwriting at Loyola Marymount University’s School of Film & Television. During the 2019 Writers Workshops in July, she will teach the special afternoon class The Alchemy of Adaptation: From Book to Screen.

Howard Norman

Howard Norman was awarded the Lannan Prize in fiction. He is the author of eight novels, including The Bird Artist, What Is Left the Daughter, and My Darling Detective.  His new novel, The Ghost Clause, will be published in July, 2019. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Maryland, but his home is in Vermont. He is also the author of three memoirs, including I Hate To Leave This Beautiful Place, and a number of books for children. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, Wenner-Gren Foundation, and the Merrill Foundation. He recently wrote the screenplay for his novel Next Life Might Be Kinder for the Bolivian director Fernando Arze. He is completing a memoir about friendship, particularly with the painter Jake Berthot, When News Filtered to the Angels They Were Overwhelmed by Loneliness.

Photo Credit: Emma Norman Photography

Victoria Patterson

Victoria Patterson is the author of the novel The Little Brother, which Vanity Fair called a “brutal, deeply empathetic, and emotionally wrenching examination of American male privilege and rape culture.” She is also the author of the novels The Peerless Four and This Vacant Paradise, a 2011 New York Times Book Review Editors Choice, and the story collections The Secret Habit of Sorrow and Drift. Drift was a finalist for the California Book Award and the Story Prize and was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by The San Francisco Chronicle. She lives in South Pasadena, California, with her family. www.victoriapatterson.com

Photo Credit: Gabriel Mason

 

Christine Pride

Christine Pride is a writer, editor and 15-year publishing veteran. She has held posts at various Big Five imprints, including Doubleday, Broadway, Crown, Hyperion, and, most recently, as a Senior Editor at Simon and Schuster. She also had a wonderful stint as a freelance editor and ghostwriter. In October 2018, Christine sold two novels, written with Jo Piazza, to Harper Collins/Morrow.  She stepped away from a full-time role at S&S in order to focus on those projects, though she still serves as an editor at large. The first book, We Are Not Like Them, will be published in Spring 2020.  As an editor, Christine has published a range of books, with a special emphasis on inspirational stories and memoirs, including Heaven is Here, A Reason to Believe, No One Tells You This, and Dear World. Christine attended the University of Missouri’s broadcast journalism program and worked in non-profit management before embarking on a career in book publishing. www.christinepride.com

Photo Credit: Brie Mulligan

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton studied creative writing at Dartmouth College and law at UC Berkeley. Her debut novel, A Kind of Freedom, was a 2017 National Book Award Nominee, a New York Times Notable Book of 2017 and a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. Her work has been published in The New York Times Book Review, Oprah.com, Lenny Letter, The Massachusetts Review, Grey Sparrow Journal, and other publications. She lives in the Bay Area, California, with her family. www.margaretwilkersonsexton.com

Photo Credit: Ben Krantz

Gregory Spatz

Gregory Spatz’s most recent book publications are the novel Inukshuk, the short story collection Half as Happy, and the forthcoming collection of linked stories and novellas What Could Be Saved (2019). His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, New England Review, Kenyon Review, Santa Monica Review, ZYZZYVA, Epoch, Glimmer Train Stories, and elsewhere. Recipient of an NEA Literature Fellowship and a Washington State Book Award, he teaches in and directs the MFA program for creative writing at Eastern Washington University. www.gregoryspatz.com

Photo Credit: Stephen Schauer

Héctor Tobar

Hector Tobar is the author of five books, including the novels The Tattooed Soldier and The Barbarian Nurseries. His nonfiction Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of Thirty-Three Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and a New York Times bestseller. The Barbarian Nurseries was a New York Times Notable Book and won the California Book Award Gold Medal for fiction. Tobar’s fiction has also appeared in Best American Short Stories 2016. His other books include the nonfiction Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States. www.hectortobar.com

 

Jane Vandenburgh

Jane Vandenburgh is the author of two novels, Failure to Zigzag and The Physics of Sunset, the nonfiction book, Architecture of the Novel: A Writer’s Handbook, the intertwining memoirs, The Wrong Dog Dream and The Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century. She has taught literature and writing at U.C. Davis, at Georgetown University, at the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and most recently, as Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at St. Mary’s in Moraga, California. She teaches a year-long course in the book-length narrative project — novel, memoir, book of connected stories — through Fishtrap, a writers’ community in Oregon. www.janevandenburgh.com

Photo Credit: Jack Shoemaker