Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch is the author of White Oleander, Paint It Black, and two novels on the Russian Revolution, The Revolution of Marina M. and Chimes of a Lost Cathedral. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Black Clock, Los Angeles Noir, Room of One’s Own, Black Warrior Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Los Angeles Times, and Real Simple. She has taught at the USC Master of Professional Writing Program, the UCLA Writer’s Program, the Esalen Institute and Pomona College. Her essay on writing from the senses appears in Writer’s Workshop in A Book: The Squaw Valley Community of Writers on the Art of Fiction. Her online writing talks, Writing Wednesdays, are available on Facebook and Youtube. www.janetfitchwrites.com

Photo credit: Cat Gwynn

Devi Laskar

Devi S. Laskar is a native of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and holds an MFA from Columbia University. The Atlas of Reds and Blueswinner of the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature and the Crook’s Corner Book Prize—is her first novel. It was selected by The Georgia Center for the Book as a book “All Georgians Should Read,” long-listed for the DSC Prize in South Asian Literature, and long-listed for the Golden Poppy Award presented by the California Independent Booksellers Alliance. The Atlas of Reds and Blues was named by The Washington Post as one of the best books of 2019, and has garnered praise in Time magazine, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Guardian, and elsewhere. A former newspaper reporter, Laskar is now a poet, photographer, essayist, and novelist. She now lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family.

www.devislaskar.com

Photo Credit: Anjini Laskar

Tom Lutz

Tom Lutz is the founding editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books and founder of the LARB Publishing Workshop, LARB Radio Hour, and LARB Books. He is the American Book Award-winning author of Born Slippy: A Novel, Aimlessness, And the Monkey Learned Nothing, Drinking Mare’s Milk, Crying, Doing Nothing, and other books, and has published over a hundred pieces in journals, magazines, newspapers, and collections, and has written for TV and film. He has taught at Iowa, Stanford, CalArts, and Copenhagen, and is now Distinguished Professor and Chair at UC Riverside’s Department of Creative Writing. https://lareviewofbooks.org/contributor/tom-lutz/

Photo Credit: David Walter Banks

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton was born and raised in New Orleans, and studied creative writing at Dartmouth College and law at UC Berkeley. Her most recent novel, The Revisioners, won an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work, was a California Book Award finalist, and was a national bestseller as well as a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her debut novel, A Kind of Freedom, was long-listed for the National Book Award and the Northern California Book Award, won the Crook’s Corner Book Prize, and was the recipient of the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Her work has been published in The Paris Review; O, The Oprah Magazine; The New York Times Book Review; and other publications. She lives in Oakland with her family. https://margaretwilkersonsexton.com/

Photo Credit: Melissa Schmidt

Gregory Spatz

Gregory Spatz’s most recent book publications are What Could Be Saved (linked short stories and novellas), Half as Happy (short stories), and the novel Inukshuk. His short stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The New England Review, Kenyon Review, Epoch, Santa Monica Review, Glimmer Train and elsewhere. Recipient of a Washington State Book Award and an NEA Fellowship, he teaches in and directs the MFA program for creative writing at Eastern Washington University. http://www.gregoryspatz.com/

Photo Credit: Julia Graff