Lisa Alvarez

Lisa Alvarez’s poetry and prose has been published in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Huizache, [PANK], Santa Monica Review, TAB Journal and most recently in So It Goes, the literary journal of the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library as well as anthologies including Sudden Fiction Latino: Short-Short Stories from the United States and Latin America (Norton). Along with Andrew Tonkovich, she co-edited Orange County: A Literary Field Guide (Heyday). She is the editor of the forthcoming Why to These Rocks: 50 Years of Poems from the Community of Writers (Heyday). Born in Los Angeles, she earned an MFA from UC Irvine and has taught for nearly 30 years as a professor of English at Irvine Valley College. She co-directs the Writers Workshops, and serves serves as Assistant Program Director at the Community of Writers.

Photo credit: Brett Hall Jones

Photo Credit: Jonathan Sprague

Natalie Baszile

Natalie Baszile has a M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and is a graduate of Warren Wilson College’s MFA Program for Writers. Queen Sugar was named one of the San Francisco Chronicles’ Best Books of 2014, and nominated for an NAACP Image Award. Natalie has had residencies at the Ragdale Foundation, Virginia Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, and the Djerassi Resident Arts Program where she received the SFFILM and the Bonnie Rattner Fellowships. Her non-fiction work has appeared in Lenny LetterThe Bitter SouthernerO, The Oprah Magazine, The Rumpus.net and a number of anthologies.  For two years, she was Writer in Residence at Saint Mary’s College where she taught a fiction workshop in the MFA Program. Natalie is a member of the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto and lives in the Bay Area. [F]  www.nataliebaszile.com

 


Photo Credit: Trace Ramsey

Belle Boggs

Belle Boggs grew up in King William County, Virginia, and is a writer and teacher. Her first book, Mattaponi Queen, was published in June 2010 by Graywolf Press. Mattaponi Queen won the Bakeless Prize and the Library of Virginia Award, was short-listed for the 2010 Frank O’Connor Short Story Award, was one of Kirkus Review’s top fiction debuts for 2010, was long-listed for The Story Prize, and was a finalist for the Library of Virginia People’s Choice Award for fiction. Her fiction and nonfiction work have appeared in The Paris Review, OrionHarper’sGlimmer TrainEcotone, the Sun, and the Oxford American, among other publications. Her first nonfiction book, The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood, was published in September 2016 by Graywolf Press. Her first novel, The Ugly Bear List, is also forthcoming from Graywolf. Belle teaches in the MFA program at NC State University and lives in Chatham County, North Carolina, with her husband, daughter, and two cats. She was on staff for the Community of Writers in 2017.

 belleboggs.wordpress.com

 

Mark Childress

Childress_Cover2

Mark Childress is the author of seven novels, three books for children, and several screenplays. A native of Monroeville, Alabama, his novels include A World Made of Fire, V For Victor, Tender, Crazy in Alabama, Gone For Good, One Mississippi, and Georgia Bottoms. He lives in Hanoi, Vietnam. www.markchildress.com [F]

John Daniel

John Daniel’s books of prose, including Rogue River Journal and Looking After, have won three Oregon Book Awards for Literary Nonfiction and a Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award; and have been supported by fellowships from Literary Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, Daniel has taught as a writer-in-residence at colleges and universities across the country. Gifted, his first novel, came out in Spring 2017 from Counterpoint.  He lives with his wife, Marilyn Daniel, in the Coast Range foothills west of Eugene, Oregon. https://www.johndaniel-author.net/

Photo credit: Alexandra Shyshkina

Alex Espinoza

Alex Espinoza earned his MFA from UC Irvine and is the author of the novels Still Water Saints and The Five Acts of Diego León, both from Random House. His newest book is Cruising: An Intimate History of a Radical Pastime. He’s written for the LA Times, the NY Times Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, and NPR’s All Things Considered. The recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the MacDowell Colony, as well as an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation, he is the Tomás Rivera Endowed Chair of Creative Writing at UC Riverside and is completing a new novel. https://www.alexespinoza.com/

Photo Credit: Tracy Hall

Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch’s new novel, The Revolution of Marina M. will be released in November, 2017. Her first novel, White Oleander, a #1 New York Times bestseller and Oprah’s Book Club selection, has been translated into 24 languages and was made into a feature film. Her second novel, Paint It Black, a national bestseller, was made into a 2017 feature film, written and directed by Amber Tamblyn. She attended the Fiction Workshop at the Community of Writers in the 1980s, the Poetry Workshop in 2017, and returns frequently to teach during the Writers Workshops at the Community of Writers. www.janetfitchwrites.com

Lynn Freed

Lynn Freed’s books include seven novels, a collection of stories, and two collections of essays. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in Harper’s, The New Yorker and The Atlantic Monthly, among numerous others.  She is the recipient of the inaugural Katherine Anne Porter Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, two O. Henry Awards for fiction, and has received fellowships and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Guggenheim Foundation, among others.  Having grown up in South Africa, she came to the U.S. as a graduate student at Columbia University, where she received an MA and PhD in English Literature. She is Professor Emerita of English at the University of California, Davis, and lives in Northern California. http://www.lynnfreed.com/

Photo Credit: Mary Pitts Photography

Sands Hall

Sands Hall‘s recent memoir, Reclaiming My Decade Lost in Scientology, (Counterpoint), was a finalist for the Northern California Book Award, and a Publishers Weekly Best Book in Religion and Spirituality. She is also the author of the novel, Catching Heaven (Ballantine), a Willa Award Winner, Women Writing the West, and a Random House Reader’s Circle selection; as well as a volume of essays and exercises, Tools of the Writer’s Craft. Stories and essays have been published in such places as Iowa Review, New England Review, and Los Angeles Review of Books, and she has written several produced plays. Professor Emeritus at Franklin & Marshall College, Sands is a writing coach and teaches for the Iowa Summer Writing Festival and for the Community of Writers, among other conferences. She is also a theater artist and a singer/songwriter. Sands lives in Nevada City, California. Please visit https://sandshall.com/

Photo Credit: Tracy Hall

Paul Harding

Paul Harding is the author of two novels, Enon and Tinkers, which won a Pulitzer Prize in fiction. He has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and Harvard. He has received fellowships from the NEA, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown MA. [F]  www.tinkerspulitzer.com/

Photo credit: Ekko von Schwichow

Rachel Howard

Rachel Howard is the author of a novel, The Risk of Us, and a memoir, The Lost Night. Her fiction, essays, and dance criticism have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Waxwing, Zyzzyva, and elsewhere. The former interim director of Undergraduate Creative Writing at Warren Wilson College, she teaches frequently for Stanford Continuing Studies and at the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto. She lives in Nevada City, California. www.rachelhoward.com

Photo Credit: Emmet Cullen

 

Michael Jaime-Becerra

Michael Jaime-Becerra is a writer from El Monte, California, a working-class suburb east of East Los Angeles.  He is the author of This Time Tomorrow, a novel awarded an International Latino Book Award, and Every Night Is Ladies’ Night, a story collection that received the California Book Award for a First Work of Fiction.  Recent essays of his have been featured in the Los Angeles Times, ZYZZYVA, and The Los Angeles Review of Books.

Photo Credit: EVJ

 

Louis B. Jones

Louis B. Jones is the author of the novels Ordinary Money (Viking); Particles and Luck and California’s Over (Pantheon); Radiance, and Innocence (Counterpoint). His short fiction and essays have appeared in ZYZZYVA, The Threepenny Review, Open City, The Sun, Santa Monica Review, the Pushcart Prize, and The Best of Pushcart anthology. He co-directs the Writers Workshops at the Community of Writers.  www.louisbjones.com

Photo Credit: Brett Hall Jones 

Dylan Landis

Dylan Landis is the author of a novel, Rainey Royal, and a collection of linked stories, Normal People Don’t Live Like This. Her short fiction has appeared in Tin House, Bomb, the Santa Monica Review and the O. Henry Prize Stories 2014, and her personal essays in Harper’s Magazine, The New York Times Book Review and the anthology What My Mother and I Don’t Talk About. She attended the Community of Writers as a participant in 2001, and has returned several times to teach. https://www.dylanlandis.com/

Photo Credit: Lauren Shay Lavin

Krys Lee

Krys Lee is the author of Drifting House and How I Became a North Korean, and the translator of I Hear Your Voice and Diary of a Murderer: And Other Stories by Young-ha Kim. She is the recipient of the Rome Prize and the Story Prize Spotlight Award, and a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize and the BBC International Story Prize. Her fiction, journalism, and literary translations have appeared in Granta, the New York Times Book Review, Corriere della Sera, and The Guardian, among others. She is an assistant professor of creative writing and literature at Yonsei University, Underwood International College, in South Korea. www.kryslee.com

Photo Credit: Matt Douma

Tom Lutz

Tom Lutz is the founding editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books and founder of the LARB Publishing Workshop, LARB Radio Hour, and LARB Books. He is the American Book Award-winning author of Born Slippy: A Novel, Aimlessness, And the Monkey Learned Nothing, Drinking Mare’s Milk, Crying, Doing Nothing, and other books, and has published over a hundred pieces in journals, magazines, newspapers, and collections, and has written for TV and film. He has taught at Iowa, Stanford, CalArts, and Copenhagen, and is now Distinguished Professor and Chair at UC Riverside’s Department of Creative Writing. https://lareviewofbooks.org/contributor/tom-lutz/

Photo Credit: David Walter Banks

Christopher Monger

Christopher Monger is a writer/director in film and television who has directed eight feature films and written over thirty screenplays. He was born in Wales but has lived in Los Angeles since the mid 80’s. He is best known for his film The Englishman Who Went Up A Hill But Came Down a Mountain and his screenplay for the Emmy Award-winning HBO film, Temple Grandin, which was also nominated for an Academy Award. For writing and directing, his many awards include, the Christopher Award for the film Seeing Red and the Hollywood Film Festival Award for the Girl From Rio. Currently, here is writing a miniseries for HBO and a feature film for Amazon Films.

He will teach the special Adaptation Class this summer on Film and TV Adaptation, (five 90-minute afternoon sessions). The class will be a practical approach to adapting a novel into a screenplay or miniseries. There will be an overview of the fundamentals of screenwriting as well as an analysis of the specific skills for a successful adaptation. We will explore the crucial differences between the mediums, their respective strengths and weaknesses, and examine a handful of adaptations, comparing and contrasting the films with the original material. Indicate your interest in the application form.  $250 fee.

Photo credit: Betsy Zajko

 

Martin J. Smith

Martin J. Smith is an award-winning journalist and author of five suspense novels, including the Edgar Award-nominated Straw Men and the thriller Combustion; and five nonfiction books, including The Wild Duck Chase, the essay collection Mr. Las Vegas Has a Bad Knee, and the forthcoming Going to Trinidad: A Doctor, a Colorado Town, and Stories from an Unlikely Gender Crossroads  (Bower House, April 2021). A participant at the Community of Writers in 1992, Smith has been returning as a faculty member since 2002. https://martinjsmith.com/

Photo credit: Brett Hall Photography

 

Gregory Spatz

Gregory Spatz’s most recent book publications are What Could Be Saved (linked short stories and novellas), Half as Happy (short stories), and the novel Inukshuk. His short stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The New England Review, Kenyon Review, Epoch, Santa Monica Review, Glimmer Train and elsewhere. Recipient of a Washington State Book Award and an NEA Fellowship, he teaches in and directs the MFA program for creative writing at Eastern Washington University. http://www.gregoryspatz.com/

Photo Credit: Julia Graff

Andrew Tonkovich

Andrew Tonkovich edits the West Coast literary arts journal Santa Monica Review and hosts a weekly books show and podcast, Bibliocracy Radio, on KPFK (90.7 FM) in Southern California.  His essays, fiction, and reviews have appeared in the OC Weekly, Faultline, Juked, The Rattling Wall, ZYZZYVA, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Best American Nonrequired Reading.  He is the co-editor with Lisa Alvarez of Orange County: A Literary Field Guide (Heyday), author of a comic novella collection, The Dairy of Anne Frank, and a forthcoming short story collection.  He teaches writing at UC Irvine, where he works with the union representing Librarians and Lecturers.

Photo Credit: Brett Hall Jones

Josh Weil

Josh Weil is the author of the novel The Great Glass Sea, the novella collection The New Valley, and story collection The Age of Perpetual Light. A Fulbright Fellow and National Book Foundation 5-under-35 honoree, he has been awarded The American Academy of Arts and Letters’ First Fiction Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the GrubStreet National Book Prize, the Library of Virginia Literary Award, the California Book Award, and a Pushcart. A writing teacher for over a decade, he has most recently taught in the MFA program at U.C. Irvine and at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference. www.joshweil.com

Photo credit: Brett Hall Photography
Al Young

Al Young

Al Young, former California poet laureate, is the award-winning author of more than 25 books of fiction and non-fiction. Recent and forthcoming publications include “How October Works” in Miramar 4 (Christopher Buckley, editor), “The Drummer Omar: Poet of Percussion” in Best American Poetry 2016 (David Lehman, editor, Edward Hirsch, guest editor, Scribner); Dear Denise, a memoir of his decades-long friendship with poet Denise Levertov in Denise Levertov in Company (Donna Hollenberg, editor, University of South Carolina Press); A Top-Down Motown Bebop Pubescence in Heaven Was Detroit: From Jazz to Hip-Hop and Beyond (M.L. Liebler, editor, Wayne State University Press). This fall he was Cockefair Writer in Residence (Sept. 25-28) at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Three books appeared in 2017: 22 Moon Poems, October Variations, and Love Offline. [F/NF]  www.alyoung.org